“We won’t be able to fully understand the extinction dynamics until we understand what normal ecological processes were going on in the background.” says Larsson. In the In the early hours of September 16, 1988, fire completely destroyed the Taras H. Shevchenko Museum (Figure 1) located in a 64 752-m2 (16-acre) park in Oakville, Ontario. The steps in the building recovery were well defined and involved the coordination of cleaning of the building by a commercial cleaning company, with demolition, reconstruction, and restoration by building trades. El rescate involucró la recuperación interdependiente del edificio del Museo, sus programas y perfil público, la colección y otros materials del Museo que no forman parte la colección. /// [Spanish] En 1990 el Museo Real de Saskatchewan en Regina, Canadá sufrió un incendio masivo que cubrió de hollín todo el Museo. Request Permissions. From this, we were able to reconstruct what the Cretaceous forests looked like with and without fire disturbance," says Hans Larsson, Canada Research Chair in Macroevolution at McGill University. The Fire at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum, Part 1: Salvage, Initial Response, and the Implications for Disaster Planning March 2000 Journal of the American Institute for Conservation 39(1):15 2 2. The Journal of the American Institute for Conservation (JAIC) is an international peer-reviewed periodical for the art conservation profession. The recovery involved not only the collection but also the rehabilitation of the museum's building and furnishings, its educational programs, and its public image. Cleaning of soot-covered collection and noncollection museum material was carried out in the museum building (while the building was being restored) and in a warehouse. Water May Be Present On All Rocky Planets, Eating Early in Day Does Not Impact Weight Loss, Rivers Melt Arctic Ice, Warming Air and Ocean, Half of Sun-Like Stars Could Host Rocky Planets, Early Big-Game Hunters Were Likely Female, Positive Outlook Predicts Less Memory Decline, Touch and Taste? JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization helping the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways. Museums protected with an automatic sprinkler system and an automatic smoke detection system, both monitored on a full-time basis, experience little loss. In 1990 the Royal Saskatchewan Museum in Regina, Canada, suffered a massive fire, resulting in a heavy deposition of soot throughout the museum. The collection was severely damaged again in 1990 when fire broke out in the First Nations Gallery, which was then under construction. Cleaning of soot-covered collection and noncollection museum material was carried out in the museum building (while the building was being restored) and in a warehouse. "We were looking at the direct result of a 66-million-year old forest fire, preserved in stone," says Emily Bamforth, of the Royal Saskatchewan Museum and the study's first author. Of all the detrimental agents affecting museumsFootnote 1today, fire causes the most damage in the least amount of time. Register to receive personalised research and resources by email, The Fire at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum, Part 1: Salvage, Initial Response, and the Implications for Disaster Planning, /doi/pdf/10.1179/019713600806113338?needAccess=true, Journal of the American Institute for Conservation. As far back as the time of the dinosaurs, 66 million years ago, forests recovered from fires in the same manner they do today, according to a team of researchers from McGill University and the Royal Saskatchewan Museum. Most vulnerable are museums composed of combustible framing and combustible interior finishes such as found in historic houses. Includes: museums, art galleries, historic house museums, libraries, and archives. Arson was the suspected cause. Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. By closing this message, you are consenting to our use of cookies. The Museum collection, then housed in the Provincial Legislative Building, was decimated by the 1912 Regina Cyclone. Everything in the Museum was coated in a thick layer of black soot. Soot removal involved conventional conservation cleaning techniques and "bulk" cleaning methods.